Fate and Transport of Hydrocarbons: Contamination and Its Relationship to Our Lives
 

Public concern over the effects of chemical releases into the environment through human activity has grown steadily since the inception of the U.S. EPA on December 2, 1970.

...Read More



 

Blog Categories


Upcoming Webinars

Using eCAP To Plan for Compliance
Fate and Transport of Hydrocarbons: Contamination and Its Relationship to Our Lives
Face to Face with Phase I and Phase II ESA's
Solutions to the Environmental Sword of Damocles: EHS Audits and the eCAP Program.
Study finds corrosive well water prevalent in half of U.S. states

Marketing Department

Half of U.S. states have a high prevalence of well water that’s corrosive enough to leach lead from pipes, according to a report published by the Associated Press. The findings come from a new study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey that included an analysis of more than 20,000 wells nationwide, and found that 25 states have groundwater with a “…high prevalence of being potentially corrosive.”

Consuming corrosive water can cause health-related problems when it reacts with pipes containing lead or copper; metals from plumbing materials can mix with the water. Signs of metal in drinking water include bluish-green stains in sinks, metallic taste and small leaks in plumbing fixtures, according to the study.

The study found the highest prevalence of corrosive water primarily in the Eastern and Southeastern U.S. states, including Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island and South Carolina, as well as the District of Columbia.

It is important for well owners to maintain and monitor the water quality of wells to ensure the safety of their drinking water. Click here to learn about August Mack’s well monitoring and installation services.

Post Date: 1/18/2018



© August Mack Environmental, Inc.