Fate and Transport of Hydrocarbons: Contamination and Its Relationship to Our Lives
 

Public concern over the effects of chemical releases into the environment through human activity has grown steadily since the inception of the U.S. EPA on December 2, 1970.

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Fate and Transport of Hydrocarbons: Contamination and Its Relationship to Our Lives
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Battery Safety

Marketing Department

When used correctly, batteries provide a safe and dependable source of power. However, if they are misused, mishandled or abused, overheating, leakage, or in extreme cases explosion or fire, can occur.

On rare occasions, batteries can leak or explode with little to no contributing causes.  Simply taking a battery from a cold environment to a warm or hot environment can be enough to cause the battery to malfunction.

The above battery exploded on an employee’s desk.  The cause of the explosion was not determined, however there was no evidence that the battery was mishandled.

Follow these safety principles when using batteries:

  • Always follow warnings and manufacturer instructions for both the batteries and the battery-operated product. Use only the correct type and size battery indicated.
  • Check the contacts of both the battery and the battery-operated product for cleanliness.
  • Always insert the batteries correctly with regard to polarity (-/+), matching the positive and negative symbols of both battery and product. Putting them in backwards, the product will sometimes still operate, but may inadvertently charge the batteries resulting in venting or leaking.
  • Remove and safely dispose of exhausted batteries immediately.
  • Replace all batteries in battery-operated products at the same time and with the batteries of the same type and manufacture.
  • Do not short circuit batteries. When the positive (+) and negative (-) terminals of a battery are in contact with each other, the battery can become short circuited. For example, loose batteries in a pocket with keys or coins can be short circuited possibly resulting in venting or explosion.
  • Do not heat batteries.
  • Do not crush, puncture, dismantle or otherwise damage batteries.
  • Do not charge non-rechargeable batteries.
  • Keep batteries out of reach of small children.
Post Date: 5/15/2018



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